National Library of the Republic of Tatarstan / XOPA

National Library of the Republic of Tatarstan / XOPA

© Ivan Erofeev© Ivan Erofeev© Ivan Erofeev© Ivan Erofeev+ 27


  • Zoned Area of ​​this architecture project Zoned:
    15102 m²

  • Year Year of realization of this architectural project

    Year:


    2020


  • Photographs

  • Manufacturers Marks with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Gerflor, Interface, MDM-LIGHT, Diodis, Gross obligation, Linolit, OWA, Saint Gobain Ecophon BV Ettenleur, Solargia, Arsenal Stolyarny

  • Main architects:

    M. Mikadze, O. Shukurov, A. Perevalova


© Ivan Erofeev
© Ivan Erofeev

Text description provided by the architects. The National Library of the Republic of Tatarstan is located in a building erected in 1987 for the Kazan branch of the Lenin Central Museum. The building, clad in Armenian tufa thus resembling the image of a waving Soviet flag, is one of the centerpieces of Kazan and a significant example of late Soviet architecture. After the collapse of the USSR, the National Cultural Center “Kazan” was located there, which also housed a museum of the city of Kazan until recently. The most remarkable achievement of the project, while respecting the material and spatial characteristics of the original design, was to transform a dark and antiquated structure into a dynamic and lively public space.

© Ivan Erofeev
© Ivan Erofeev

The historical architecture of the Tatars reveals approaches that are quite consistent with the late Soviet “monumentalness” in terms of both the organization of space and the use of materials and color solutions. In keeping with the essence of Tatarstan’s historical architecture and with attention to Soviet heritage, materials are used in their simplest, yet most solemn form.

© Ivan Erofeev
© Ivan Erofeev
Section
Section
© Ivan Erofeev
© Ivan Erofeev

The double-height central vestibule connects the essential functions of the building and the bank of the Kazanka River to the town square. Thus, the vestibule not only connects the different parts of the building but also the different fragments of the urban fabric surrounding the building. The vertical surfaces of the vestibule are solved with green serpentine, white marble, sandstone and white plaster. The floor is a breach with similarly colored rocks, while the ceiling is finished with visually seamless grained acoustic panels.

© Ivan Erofeev
© Ivan Erofeev
© Ivan Erofeev
© Ivan Erofeev

To the west of the vestibule, on the ground floor, are the multifunctional spaces of the public library, including reading areas for toddlers, children and teenagers, a computer lab and a music room. This part of the National Library is most notable for being as open and inclusive as possible for all user groups. Its interiors are resolved in a progressive, ascetic and democratic way, using the natural texture of concrete, metal and glass, upholstery in soothing colors and accent lighting.

© Ivan Erofeev
© Ivan Erofeev
First floor plan
First floor plan
© Ivan Erofeev
© Ivan Erofeev

To the east of the vestibule, on the second floor, are the reading areas of a university library. The architecture of the spaces of the university library pays homage to the Soviet architecture of late modernism. Spatially, compared to the original plan of the museum, the library space inherits a staircase structure composed of three successive levels. These levels effectively house spaces for individual and group study, a catalog area, linear exhibition space, and a notable sculpture – “Anti-War Demonstration” – an artifact of the original design.

© Ivan Erofeev
© Ivan Erofeev

The ceiling of this part of the National Library is resolved by an ornamental pattern of tubular skylights and artificial lighting. Floors are warm beige binder epoxy terrazzo filled with brown and gray marble stone aggregate, walls are white plaster, furniture and wall panels are finished in natural oak. In addition to the main library spaces, the National Library building houses a lecture hall, the Whitebox exhibit hall, the Blackbox hall, a recording studio, conference rooms, staff offices and several depots of books.

© Ivan Erofeev
© Ivan Erofeev

Rose D. Jones